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Shower Thoughts - Living Laudato Si

We all know that the best ideas come when you are having a shower. This morning while cleaning my shower with my zero-waste shower cleaner:

(I use vinegar and detergent from the bulk shop to make the cleaner. I am still using an old spray bottle that I've had for years).


I was thinking about what it really means to live laudato si. I know that in that moment, I was living it, using an old rag made form some old flanno sheets to scrub my shower with my zero-waste shower cleaner. But, what does that mean.


I decided that this is what it truly means to live laudato si.


To consciously make decisions in every moment that demonstrates concern for the earth and the poor, while moving away from materialism, anthropocentrism and the throwaway culture.


I'm going to break this down a bit more.


Making decisions can be decided what to buy, where to buy, what to do, where to go, how to get there, who to talk to, how you talk to that person etc etc.


Materialism is the wanting of things. But that too requires great effort to consciously try and not want things, or decide whether the thing that you want is a need or a want.


Anthropocentrism is the belief that humans are above everything in the world. If you are choosing to put your wants or needs above that of the environment or of other people, that is anthropocentric.


The throwaway culture is the opposite of 'if it isn't broken, don't fix it.' The attitude is more like, 'can I get a better/shinier/newer/improved/fresher one?' or 'it's slightly used and slightly broken, just chuck it out.' We have to consistently decide how to repurpose, reuse, re-gift, etc etc etc to combat the throwaway culture.


Some people would argue that within Laudato Si, that is only half of what the Pope is asking us to do. That is true. He is also asking us to dialogue. But there is a time for speaking, a time for listening and a time for living. The living part comes all the time.


Living Laudato Si, is about choices.


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  © Alice Carwardine 2020 from Overturn the Tables.